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The Deadly Consequences of a Common American Habit

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Mary McNally
Mary McNally is a UK-based author exploring the intersection of fashion, culture, and communication. With a talent for vivid storytelling, Mary's writing captures the complexities of modern life engagingly and authentically.

A man in Florida, USA, died after being infected by a brain-eating amoeba as a result of a common habit.

And Florida medical authorities indicated that the man contracted the brain-eating amoeba through his nose as a result of sinus lavage with tap water that was likely contaminated by it.

And the Florida Department of Health said last February 23 that it is looking into how the man became infected and is working with authorities to coordinate any changes it deems necessary to contain the bacteria and prevent its spread. .

And the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed that although a person contracted the brain-eating amoeba from tap water, tap water in the region is still drinkable because the amoeba is a rare single-celled organism and can only infect humans. through the nose.

And the medical authority indicated that this was the first case of human infection with amoebiasis through tap water in Florida, as well as the first case reported in the United States this year and the first in the winter.

And health authorities in the US have urged the public to use distilled or sterile water only when preparing sinus rinse solutions, and to seek immediate medical attention if they notice any symptoms of a brain-eating amoeba such as: headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, stiff neck, loss of balance or hallucinations.

According to US medical authorities, the total number of cases of brain-eating amoeba infections in the US did not exceed 31 between 2012 and 2021.

Infection with brain-eating amoebae can occur by nasal entry into amoeba-infested water, which is then transmitted to the brain, by swimming or diving in freshwater lakes, or by ingestion of contaminated tap water, as in the case of nasal cleansing. sinuses. Transmitted by infection from person to person.

Source: foxweather.com + wglt.org

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